Vibrotactile Head-Mounted Display

Latest News

- TVCG Paper, Research Demo and Doctoral Consortium Poster presented at IEEE VR 2017.
- Paper about a "Vibrotactile HMD for 3D Spaces" at IEEE VR 2017 and IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (TVCG).
- 3rd Place on People's Choice Award for Demo presented in AsiaHaptics, 2016.
- Follow our project Haptic Communication for Human-computer Interaction in ResearchGate for more news.

Designing a Vibrotactile Head-mounted Display for Spatial Awareness in 3D Spaces

IEEE VR 2017 / TVCG

Authors: de JESUS OLIVEIRA, V. A., BRAYDA, L., NEDEL, L., MACIEL, A.

Tactile Treasure Map: Integrating Allocentric and Egocentric Information for Tactile Guidance

ASIAHAPTICS 2016

Authors: MEMEO, M., de JESUS OLIVEIRA, V. A., NEDEL, L., MACIEL, A., BRAYDA, L.

Localized Magnification in Vibrotactile HMDs for Accurate Spatial Awareness

EUROHAPTICS 2016

Authors: de JESUS OLIVEIRA, V. A., NEDEL, L., MACIEL, A., BRAYDA, L.

Spatial Discrimination of Vibrotactile Stimuli Around the Head

Haptics Symposium 2016

Authors: de JESUS OLIVEIRA, V. A., NEDEL, L., MACIEL, A., BRAYDA, L.

Experiencing Guidance in 3D Spaces with a Vibrotactile Head-mounted Display
IEEE VR 2017

Vibrotactile feedback is broadly used to support different tasks in virtual and augmented reality applications, such as navigation, communication, attentional redirection, or to enhance the sense of presence in virtual environments. Thus, we aim to include the haptic component to the most popular wearable used in VR applications: the VR headset. After studying the acuity around the head for vibrating stimuli, and trying different parameters, actuators, and configurations, we developed a haptic guidance technique to be used in a vibrotactile Head-mounted Display (HMD). Our vibrotactile HMD was made to render the position of objects in a 3D space around the subject by varying both stimulus loci and vibration frequency. In this demonstration, the participants will interact with different scenarios where the mission is to select a number of predefined objects. However, instead of displaying occlusive graphical information to point to these objects, vibrotactile cues will provide guidance in the VR setup.

Tactile Treasure Map: Integrating Allocentric and Egocentric Information for Tactile Guidance
ASIAHAPTICS 2016

With interactive maps a person can manage to find the way from one point to another, using an allocentric perspective (e.g. Google Maps), but also to view a location as from the inside of the map, using an egocentric perspective (e.g. Google Street View). Such experience cannot be performed with tactile maps, mostly explored from a top-view. To solve this, we built a system with two different but complementary devices. When coupled, they can provide both allocentric and egocentric spatial information to support the exploration of interactive tactile maps. To show the potential of the system, we built a blind treasure hunt.

Do Not Guess It, Just Feel It: Experiencing Vibrotactile Guidance on a Head-mounted Display
EUROHAPTICS 2016

The skin around the head is very sensitive to mechanical stimulation. That motivates the design of tactile devices that can be worn around the head to aid locomotion, obstacle detection, and to be used as a complementary channel for communication. With the popularization of Head-mounted Displays, the tactile stimulation can also be used to enhance user experience in VR. In this demonstration, we present a searching game in which the user must find an object of interest in a virtual scene, aided by a vibrotactile headband on an HMD. The main level consists of a card guessing game, where the mission is to identify the Joker card. However, instead of guessing, our ``magician'' will be guided by the tactile headband. The participants will realize that not only it is easy to use the tactile guidance but also that it is very entertaining.

The Invisible Enemy: Playing with Vibrotactile Guidance on a Head-mounted Display
SVR 2016

The skin around the head is very sensitive to mechanical stimulation. That motivates the design of tactile devices that can be worn around the head to aid locomotion, obstacle detection, and to be used as a complementary channel for communication. With the popularization of Head-mounted Displays, the tactile stimulation can also be used to enhance user experience in VR. In this demonstration, we present a searching game in which the user must find an object of interest in a virtual scene, aided by a vibrotactile headband on an HMD.